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Old 28-08-2011, 03:07 PM
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Default Numismatic Guide

Any books on Numismatic for Gold Coins that I can read? As in what to look out for in coins that will appreciate in collectors value and guidelines to determine numismatic value.
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Old 28-08-2011, 03:41 PM
ruzmidah ruzmidah is offline
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I think Kraus is considered the standard book for coins.

But it has many editions plus its so thick.... =(
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Old 29-08-2011, 01:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ruzmidah View Post
I think Kraus is considered the standard book for coins.
Is it on gold coins?
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Old 29-08-2011, 09:48 AM
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Kraus is a catalogue which is a good price reference but it doesn't really tell you which are the coins that has good collectors value.

I don't think there is any one book that will cover all numismatic coin as the market is just too diverse. Each country has their own collector base and their own sought after numismatic coins. The numismatic mkt is very cyclical. Also, the general state of economy will influence the purchasing power of the collectors. China is a good example. 5 years ago nobody chase their coins but now anything chinese carries a huge premium.

The best way to get a good feel of what are the collector's chasing is to join various coin collector's forum and also follow the results of coin auctions. You can also try to attend local coin auction to get a feel of the mkt and also learn from the season collectors.

Here are some coin sites to visit:
http://www.mavininternational.com/
http://coins.ha.com/c/index.zx
http://www.livebusinesschat.com/
http://www.pcgs.com/
http://www.ngccoin.com/index.aspx

Hope this helps.
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Old 29-08-2011, 09:48 AM
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Kraus is a catalog of coins from every countries, from old world to modern.
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Old 29-08-2011, 11:14 AM
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try avoid rare coins, there is no market whatsoever here.

people already having hard time just letting go bullion proof gold coins.

i think the most important thing is to know what you are buying, if you know nothing, then you can not make anything out of it. can not just leave this to luck.
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Old 29-08-2011, 11:43 AM
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It is very difficult for look for gold coin with great numismatic value unless you want to pay huge premium for it. eg, china gold coins, 1/2oz a pc calling 5-6k sing dollars.
For me, I myself collect singapore mint coin, eg, lunar series etc...
1. they are near gold price, 2. they are proof, 3. some come in box and coa, 4. 100% authentic 5. easy to source around 6. best of all, easy exchangeable to cash.
above are my opinion only.
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Old 29-08-2011, 05:42 PM
getiton getiton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anlok View Post
Any books on Numismatic for Gold Coins that I can read? As in what to look out for in coins that will appreciate in collectors value and guidelines to determine numismatic value.
Anlok, try this book:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/089...SIN=0896896439

Standard Catalog of Modern World Gold Coins, 1801-Present by Colin Bruce (Author), Thomas Michael (Author)
Whether you're new to gold coin collecting, or a seasoned collector thrilled to have an updated gold coins price guide, you'll find that the identifying details and thoroughly analyzed and up-to-date values in this book answer all your gold coin questions.
Packed with 300,000 coin values and 15,000+ full-size photos of the most popular gold coins of the last 200 years, this book helps you track the increased value of your coins easily and accurately.
This ideal collector and investor reference also features:
* Easy-to-read precious metals valuation charts to help you stay on top of a rapidly changing market
* Essential expert advice to help you make smart collecting decisions
* Detailed descriptions for easy identification
* Pricing from leading world coin experts
About the Author
Colin R. Bruce II is one of the creators of Krause Publications' legendary Standard Catalog series, and has worked at Krause for 35+ years. George Cuhaj is an accomplished researcher and numismatist, and he brings a lifetime of experience to every book. He edits both the Standard Catalog of World Coins and Standard Catalog of World Paper Money series. Tom Michael is Krause Publication's veteran market analyst, providing in-depth price analysis for numismatic books for more than 20 years.
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Old 29-08-2011, 10:34 PM
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Default What's a Numismatic Coin ...and Why You Should NOT Buy Them!

What's a Numismatic Coin ...and Why You Should NOT Buy Them!


The following article first appeared in the July, 1996 Moneychanger. I am reprinting it now because over and over coin dealers keep repeating the same false claims which this article disproves. These include:

1. "Numismatic" coins are exempt from government seizure by law. Totally false - no basis in statute or regulation.

2. Customer purchases of bullion gold coins must be reported to the government, but numismatic coins don't have to be reported. Totally false - no report is required when you buy gold, regardless whether it is bullion or numismatic. Only sales of certain gold and silver items must be reported, and then only when they exceed certain quantities.

3. Coins minted before 1934 are exempt from government seizure. Totally false - no basis in statute or regulation.

4. United States $20 gold pieces minted before 1934 are exempt from government gold seizure. Totally false - no basis in statute or regulation. In fact, it was mainly these coins which the government seized in 1933.

5. The law defines "numismatic coins" as those having a premium of 15% or more over their gold content. Totally false - no basis in statute or regulation. A regulation was proposed in 1984, but never adopted.

6. The law defines United States $20 gold pieces as "numismatic" coins. Totally false - no basis in statute or regulation.

Let the buyer beware! You should buy what is best for you, not what is best for some coin dealer. In emergencies (such as Y2K), all values tend to sink to their lowest common denominator. With gold and silver coins, that means their precious metal content. Premiums, especially numismatic premiums that depend on stable markets & widespread prosperity, cannot survive that sort of pressure. Why spend money to buy premium that does not bring you any benefit? If you have numismatic coins, act now, while you can, to convert that numismatic premium into more gold and silver by swapping your numismatic coins for bullion coins. Call, fax, or e-mail us a list of your coins and we will calculate exactly how much gain in ounces of gold or silver that swap would net you. - F. Sanders

Collecting coins can be a hobby both fascinating and rewarding. In the past 25 years, investors have discovered the exotic world of numismatics and jumped in with big bucks. Riding the wave of mythical profits in numismatic coins, dealers in the '70s set up boiler rooms where salesmen armed with WATS lines pushed quasi-numismatic coins like US silver dollars or $20 gold pieces. I say "quasi"-numismatic because so many of these exist that they aren't truly "rare" coins, although they carry big premiums over their gold or silver value, and they can dance and jump when the gold bull is raging.

The problem is, gold and silver dealers keep on convincing people to buy the more expensive US $20 gold pieces on the basis that they are "numismatic" coins. What difference does that make? When gold was confiscated in 1934, they say, "numismatic" coins were exempted.

I don't find that logic convincing. The exemption in 1933 was very vague: "gold coins having a recognized special value to collectors of rare and unusual coins" (Presidential Proclamation of 4/5/1933). Worse yet, our government tyrants are notoriously arbitrary. If they confiscate gold a second time, why would you expect them to be consistent? Besides, who will turn in his gold if his family's safety depends on it? Besides, in 1933 US $20s comprised the largest part of banks' gold reserves, and most assuredly were not exempted from seizure.

WHAT ABOUT DEFINITIONS?

But here's a new twist on things. In the past 15 years dealers have been hammering out regulations with IRS about the definition of "numismatic" coins. Many dealers aver that some government regulation defines a "numismatic coin" as one that costs more than 15% over its gold or silver value. (We'll examine this claim more closely in a moment.) Relying on that definition, gold and silver dealers urge you to buy US $20s, which sell at far more than a 15% premium.

But so far, nobody has noticed this other, larger loophole:

The Gold Bullion Coin Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-185 of Dec. 17, 1985, 99 Statutes At Large 1177, 31 USC 5101, 5111, 5112) provided for minting the American Eagle ounce, half ounce, quarter ounce, and tenth ounce gold coins. Section 2(3) provides, "For purposes of section 5132(a)(1) of [Title 31], all coins minted under this subsection shall be considered to be numismatic items."

The Liberty Coin Act of July 9, 1985 (Public Law 99-61 of 7/9/85, 99 Stat. 115, 31 USC 5112) authorized the one ounce silver coin commonly called the Silver American Eagle. At section 202(g) it contains identical language.

By statutory definition then, the American Eagle gold coins and the silver American Eagles are "numismatic" coins. (31 USC Section 5132(a)(1) requires the Secretary of the Treasury to apply proceeds from selling "numismatic" items to cost of making them.)

Here's another kicker. I nearly wore out a law school librarian trying to find the regulation that defines a numismatic coin as one that sells for more than 15% over its bullion value, but we couldn't find it. Thanks to the Industry Council for Tangible Assets (ICTA), I found it in a proposed regulation 26 CFR 1.6045-1 on page 647-648 of the Federal Register, Vol. 49, No. 3, 1/5/1984. But that proposed regulation was never adopted, and the current 26 CFR 1.6045-1 contains none of that language. I couldn't find it in any IRS letter rulings or other decisions, either. If it exists, neither the librarian nor I could find it. [Within the month of July 1998 one customer told me that a dealer had faxed him a copy of the proposed regulation claiming that his company's corporate attorney said it was current law! When the customer asked for a letter from the attorney stating that, the salesman said that wouldn't be possible. -- FS]

What's the bottom line? Contrary to what most gold and silver dealers think, US $20 gold pieces and silver dollars do not qualify as "numismatic" coins.

However, if the federal government intends to confiscate gold, any "exemption" for "numismatic" coins has to include the American Eagle gold and silver coins. After all, not just a regulation but a statute specifically defines them as "numismatic." I wonder if dealers who keep urging customers to buy the higher priced US $20s "because their higher premium qualifies them as numismatic coins" have thought of this?

BIG BROTHER WANTS TO KNOW

...

CASH REPORTING QUIRK

...

But gold and silver American Eagles are legal tender. Crazy as it sounds, this means that you could walk into a Mercedes dealership, plunk down 201 American Eagle gold coins with a face value of $10,050 and a paper money value of F$80,400, and it wouldn't be a reportable transaction. Wait, kids, don't try this at home. Repeat: even though the IRS Assistant Chief Counsel says so, don't rely on it. But it certainly appears that there is a hole in the cash transaction reporting laws big enough to drive a 747 Jumbo Jet through. The simple way to avoid (not evade) cash reporting is to use American Eagle gold coins & silver American Eagles in everyday transactions.

Crazier still, since Customs is a part of Treasury, do you suppose that American Eagle gold coins are exempt from reporting as cash when you leave the country?

Of course it's crazy, but it's the government, shooting themselves in the toe. They hate gold & silver, and just because they want to discourage people from using it, they write it out of their regulations, but only succeed in making gold and silver more private than their phony paper money.


-- Franklin Sanders

Special thanks to the Industry Council for Tangible Assets, the trade association for gold and silver dealers for help researching this article. ICTA has done a great job over the years fighting off Big Brother, and every precious metals dealer ought to join and support them. ICTA, Box 1365, Severna Park, Maryland 21146-8365.


http://the-moneychanger.com/numismat...coin_con.phtml

in case people do not know who Franklin Sanders is
he is a regular quest interviewed in the Precious Metals Market Report section in the Solari Report. Catherine Austin Fitts offers Solari Report.

http://solari.com/store/the_solari_report/
__________________
Hear Say See -> N o ! h i n g
silver is all about demand * gold is all about supply
holding gold & silver with purpose then the rest is just strategies

Last edited by alor; 29-08-2011 at 10:43 PM.
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Old 29-08-2011, 10:51 PM
getiton getiton is offline
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i read franklin sanders daily if he updates
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